Women and the Revolution in Iran

Dr. Shirin Saeidi, an assistant professor at the University of Arkansas, visited OU in February to give a talk about a book she is working on that deals with women’s rights struggles in post-revolution Iran. Dr. Saeidi did field work in Iran for several years in order to gather stories from women and learn first hand about their experiences.

One of the focuses of Dr. Saeidi’s work was engaging with non-elite women to give voice to their stories, which are often left out of the larger narrative in Iranian society. Saeidi discussed the idea of “individual versus collective remembrance,” and how women’s individual “remembrance of the past” is often lost to the mainstream narrative that is created to characterize history. By considering how past experiences contribute to shaping women’s lives in the present, we are better able to understand how the history of their circumstances affects the ways they choose to engage in the struggle for a better life.

A fascinating moment during the lecture was when Dr. Saeidi discussed the word “feminism” and how it was perceived by women in Iran. Interestingly enough, she found that the majority of women engaged in the struggle for equality did not identify with this term. This term originated in the West, and therefore it should not be surprising that Iranian women view their fight for rights based on their own terms. Although feminism is perhaps a universal concept in what it aims to achieve, we must respect how women around the world choose to characterize and approach their own unique struggles if we wish to truly support their efforts.

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